About the INTERACT study

This study is an approximately 20-week clinical study of an investigational medicine (known as TAK-831) for negative symptoms of schizophrenia. This phase 2 study will be evaluating how safe and how effective TAK-831 is when it is taken with standard medications, as well as seeing if it affects participants’ overall quality of life.

Spotlight on negative symptoms of schizophrenia

For many people, their image of schizophrenia centers around the presence of positive symptoms, which are feelings or behaviors that are usually not present. Positive symptoms of schizophrenia include hallucinations, delusions, disorganized speech, or agitated body movements. In contrast, negative symptoms indicate an absence or decline of previously-present behaviors. Examples of negative symptoms include:

Reduced feelings of pleasure (anhedonia)

Reduced feelings of pleasure (anhedonia)

Emotionally-numb

Emotionally-numb

Social withdrawal

Social withdrawal

Difficulty beginning and sustaining activity (avolition)

Difficulty beginning and sustaining activity (avolition)

Decreased speaking and expressions

Decreased speaking and expressions

Negative symptoms can be harder for people with schizophrenia to notice compared to other types, but these symptoms can impact the quality of life for them and the people around them. There is currently no FDA approved medication for negative symptoms of schizophrenia.

Why clinical studies are important

Clinical studies are a necessary step in determining if potential new medications are safe and effective. Before any potential medication can be widely used, the FDA must review data from clinical trials and other scientific data about the medication to decide whether they should approve it for use. Clinical study data is a key component of this process. Clinical studies look to answer important questions about potential treatments, such as:

Does it work?

Does it lead to changes in people’s daily lives?

What is the best dose?

How safe is it?

Are there any side effects?

No matter the reasons you or a loved one is interested in this study, participation can potentially help bring a new medicine into the lives of patients living with negative symptoms of schizophrenia who may benefit from it. Living with negative symptoms of schizophrenia can mean a life of isolation—and while we don’t yet know whether the study medication will help, participating in this clinical study would help further scientific research. The study team thanks you for all your time, energy, and effort in considering participation in this study, as it could help us learn more about negative symptoms of schizophrenia.

The INTERACT study is currently enrolling

This study is looking to partner with adults diagnosed with schizophrenia who are currently living with negative symptoms.